Categories

Note on aeration

1 kg of water can only hold 8 mg of air, no matter whether aerators are utilized or not.

Accomplished with:

Particularly important for:

Static solution culture

Kratky method

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For:

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Cons:

Assessment:

Continuous-flow solution culture

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Pros:

Nutrient film technique (NFT)

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Needs:

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Aeroponics

Used for:

NASA research has shown that aeroponically grown plants have an 80% increase in dry weight biomass (essential minerals) compared to hydroponically grown plants. Aeroponics used 65% less water than hydroponics. NASA also concluded that aeroponically grown plants require ¼ the nutrient input compared to hydroponics.

Unlike hydroponically grown plants, aeroponically grown plants will not suffer transplant shock when transplanted to soil, and offers growers the ability to reduce the spread of disease and pathogens.

Fogponics

Passive sub-irrigation

Approach:

The various hydroponic media available, such as expanded clay and coconut husk, contain more air space than more traditional potting mixes, delivering increased oxygen to the roots, which is important in epiphytic plants such as orchids and bromeliads, whose roots are exposed to the air in nature. Additional advantages of passive hydroponics are the reduction of root rot and the additional ambient humidity provided through evaporations.

Ebb and flow (flood and drain) sub-irrigation

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Run-to-waste

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Deep water culture

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Top-fed deep water culture

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Pros:

Rotary

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Pros:

Dutch Bucket aka Bato Bucket

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